FREE hit counter and Internet traffic statistics from freestats.com

Sunday, December 30, 2007

Score One for Raines

Looks like Tim Raines just gained an additional vote for the Hall (and you can read about his case here). Two points I don't understand though. First, in discussing the qualifications of Jim Rice no mention is made of his park context which figured greatly into his peak numbers from 1975 through 1986. In fact, when you look at OPS Normalized by league and park (which is a good proxy for overall production) for players with over 1,000 plate appearances in the same period Rice ranks 28th on the list behind lots of guys who are clearly not hall of famers (he ranks 7th when not taking park into account).


Rank Name G PA OPS NOPS/PF
1 Mike Schmidt 1800 7657 931 131
2 Pedro Guerrero 825 3213 889 129
3 Don Mattingly 572 2449 913 126
4 Reggie Smith 830 3188 884 126
5 D. Strawberry 516 2107 863 125
6 George Brett 1595 6952 901 124
7 Willie Stargell 731 2547 873 123
8 Eddie Murray 1499 6415 879 122
9 Gene Tenace 1036 3642 831 122
10 Dave Winfield 1763 7482 841 121
11 Jack Clark 1235 5111 839 121
12 George Foster 1637 6763 838 120
13 Keith Hernandez 1707 7063 837 120
14 Oscar Gamble 1058 3404 852 120
15 Wade Boggs 725 3243 897 120
16 Bob Watson 1079 3993 825 119
17 Dave Parker 1652 6939 846 119
18 Greg Luzinski 1389 5766 855 119
19 Joe Morgan 1303 5390 829 119
20 Tim Raines 876 3888 823 119
21 Bob Horner 960 3966 846 118
22 Dale Murphy 1360 5689 847 118
23 Glenn Davis 276 1112 815 118
24 Ken Phelps 371 1121 865 118
25 Ken Singleton 1446 6071 834 118
26 Larry Hisle 597 2487 839 118
27 Fred Lynn 1522 6373 864 117
28 Jim Rice 1766 7754 875 117
29 Jose Cruz 1744 7043 793 117
30 Reggie Jackson 1631 6655 841 117
31 Rod Carew 1440 6219 838 117
32 Chris Brown 270 1040 788 116
33 Gary Carter 1680 6871 806 116
34 Leon Durham 862 3415 835 116
35 Rick Monday 918 2973 813 116
36 Rickey Henderso 1087 4843 828 116
37 Ron Cey 1704 6901 811 116
38 Tony Gwynn 612 2590 804 116
39 Bill Madlock 1549 6333 807 115
40 Andre Dawson 1443 6138 801 115
41 Cal Ripken 830 3562 833 115
42 Johnny Bench 1064 4082 811 115
43 Kirk Gibson 765 3104 831 115
44 Al Oliver 1496 6123 805 114
45 Alvin Davis 442 1917 838 114
46 Bobby Bonds 835 3480 811 114
47 Mike Marshall 575 2122 783 114
48 Rico Carty 674 2690 810 114
49 Bobby Grich 1516 6146 801 113
50 Andre Thornton 1405 5797 821 113


Second, there was this nugget from Peter Gammons:

Raines, Rickey Henderson and Wade Boggs were the best of the '80s and early '90s, and while some of our sabermetric fellows do not believe players are humans, Raines made every team he was on better, not just because he was such a good player, but because his effervescent personality made teammates relax and play better; you'd go out to the cage and players would all be following him around.
Why go to the trouble to paint sabermetric analysts and hence analysis in that negative light? That's the second time Gammons has done this recently. What gives?

Also saw this from Tracy Ringolsby in an otherwise good interview about the BBWAA:

Rich: Speaking of which, who are you voting for this year?

Tracy: Alphabetically, Bert Blyleven, Dave Concepcion, Rich Gossage, Jack Morris, Lee Smith and Alan Trammell. The biggest debates for me were Tim Raines, who obviously was overshadowed by Rickey Henderson, but also if you take Vince Coleman's five top years, I would say he outperformed Raines, too, and I don't see Coleman as a Hall of Famer.
Really? As the comments to the post note there is really no comparison between Raines and Coleman. If you want to compare just baserunning then Coleman had three stellar seasons in 1985-1987 that netted him over ten runs per season on the bases but Raines had five such seasons spread out over a longer period of time (1982-1992) and topped +7 runs three more times. In a previous post Chone asks me to post the career numbers for Raines, which I will do either here or on Baseball Prospectus.

1 comment:

Guy said...

Fenway in the 1970s and 80s was indeed a great place to hit (I went to a lot of games there in the 80s). Boggs also looks a whole lot better than he really was as a result. In fact, Boggs' career road OPS (.782) is slightly worse than Rice's (.789), and he was a .302 BB hitter on the road (vs. .352 at home). You have to think that, had Boggs signed with any team other than Boston, he'd be something like a .800 OPS hitter, with maybe 1 or 2 batting titles, and probably still on the outside looking in at the HOF.